Jerks excessively while turning in 4wd

Michael Diagnostician Kansas Posted   Latest   Edited  
Resolved
Chassis
Drivetrain
2015 Jeep Wrangler Sahara 3.6L (G ERB) 5-spd (W5A580)
Jerks Excessively While Turning In 4Wd

I've checked the u-joints for binding on the lift and they seem to move smoothly. The steering stabilizer isn't leaking and I've checked the brakes for binding. The steering wheel seems to kick back on me more than I've ever experienced. I'm was wondering if anyone has ever had this problem before? Is it normal? I'm not sure where to look next. The customer has owned this for several years so I'm sure it wasn't doing this before.

0
Richard Technician
New York
Richard Default
 

I own a 2013 wrangler and it does kick back on tight turns when the 4 wheel drive is on. Normal condition.

0
Default Ð Awarded
Robert Owner
Pennsylvania
Robert Default
 

Especially on hard paved surfaces.

0
Default Ð Awarded
Sisco Owner/Technician
Vermont
Sisco Default
 

I full time 4X4 and on pavement that would be normal.

0
Default Ð Awarded
Michael Technician
Kansas
Michael Resolution
 

Thanks for all your input everyone. Just never had a 4wd kick back like that.

0
Resolution Ð Awarded
Olle Instructor
Minnesota
Olle Default
 

With u-joints on the front axle, that behavior is normal. I own a Wrangler.

0
Default Ð Awarded
Marlin Technician
Oregon
Marlin Default
 

It depends on the tires. The lower and stiffer the tread, the worse it is.

0
Default Ð Awarded
Jared Diagnostician
Maryland
Jared Default
 

Crowhopping is the term we use for it. In 4wd lock, front and rear wheels are trying to turn same speed, which in a tight turn, is being fought by the friction between tires and pavement.

0
Default Ð Awarded
Joseph Owner/Technician
Maryland
Joseph Default
 

That is correct only when it is in four wheel drive but if not check the wheel bearings , when turning the rotors can jam against the brake pads causing the wheel to pull , we service a Benz G Wagon that did the same we replace both front wheel bearings and fixed the problem.

0
Default Ð Awarded
Gary Owner/Technician
Colorado
Gary Default
 

Hello, Michael When navigating a turn, the inside wheel should “lead” the outside wheel by about 2 degrees toe angle. This won't happen if you have too much toe-in. So, reducing the toe angle to minimum specification might help your wheel hop situation.

0
Default Ð Awarded
Disagree
Mark Engineer
Colorado
Mark Default
 

Michael here in Colorado we work on a lot of Jeeps. If it is on dry surface (pavement the worse due to excellent traction) what you describe is what we usually see. AWD slightly different because there is a clutch in transfer case Try short road test in lose dirt or sand. Probably will see big change

0
Default Ð Awarded
Michael Owner/Technician
New York
Michael Default
 

Mike to Mike, What transfer case is in it ?

0
Default Ð Awarded
Robert Owner/Technician
Virginia
Robert Default
   

Their is a clutch in the transfer case if it locks up you will have severe crab same with all wheel Chevy pickups check part number on case or rpo If no one has put wrong case in it Jeep you know

-1
Default Ð Awarded
Craig Technical Support Specialist
Illinois
Craig Default
 

Michael, use a cloth tape measure and check tire diameters, after verifying pressures of course. They should all be very close in measurements. If you have several different diameters it tends to bind the transfer case.

0
Default Ð Awarded
Marlin Technician
Oregon
Marlin Default
   

But, this doesn't correlate concisely with the provided concern. If tire diameters (circumferences) are not closely matched, binding will occur during all 4WD operation, not just while turning.

0
Default Ð Awarded
Timothy Owner/Technician
Wisconsin
Timothy Default
 

Not if it has a clutch for the front and rear axles in the t-case. The circumference difference would have to be severe to affect it in a straight line…

-1
Default Ð Awarded
Marlin Technician
Oregon
Marlin Default
 

Do you mean a viscous clutch? In a Wrangler?

0
Default Ð Awarded
Timothy Owner/Technician
Wisconsin
Timothy Default
 

Almost anything with AWD has them. Doubtful about the NV241…which relies on a different design for ‘adjusting’ for driveshaft ‘slip’. Either way, if the internals are trying to compensate for that, it would be exacerbated by tight turns.

0
Default Ð Awarded
Marlin Technician
Oregon
Marlin Default
   

Apparently you are not familiar with Wrangler's. This vehicle does not have AWD, and the issues which you mentioned do not apply.

+1
Default Ð Awarded
Agree
Timothy Owner/Technician
Wisconsin
Timothy Default
 

Although not familiar with the NV241 specifically, I did say that I was doubtful that the T-case has a clutch, as it's not AWD. Obviously, it does not have an Auto system for 4H on-board, which is also not a viscous clutch set-up. Basically a Wrangler has a very old-school design. Thanks for the correction.

0
Default Ð Awarded
Timothy Owner/Technician
Wisconsin
Timothy Default
 

You need to check the circumference, not the diameter. Put chalk marks on all the wheels at 6:00 position. Drive the Jeep for about twenty feet in a straight ahead manner. Stop, and check the position of all the marks. They should all be very close to the same on each wheel. Any that are off, indicates a circumference issue, meaning the tires are rotating at different speeds, which can increase…

0
Default Ð Awarded
Craig Diagnostician
Illinois
Craig Default
 

Timothy thanks for the correction, been a long day. But yes circumference not diameter my bad.

0
Default Ð Awarded
John Diagnostician
Colorado
John Default
 

Another thing you can check is if the CV joint is damaged. Jack up the front end and turn the wheel all the way to the left or right. Then turn the wheels by hand and feel for any binding. Should turn freely. I do this on bigger pickups and trucks to find a bad u joint.

0
Default Ð Awarded
Carey Technician
Indiana
Carey Default
 

The transfer case is intended to be driven in the 2H position for normal street and highway conditions such as hard-surfaced roads. In the event that additional traction is required, the transfer case 4H and 4L positions can be used to lock the front and rear driveshafts together, forcing the front and rear wheels to rotate at the same speed. The 4H and 4L positions are intended for loose…

+2
Default Ð Awarded
Agree
Sisco Owner/Technician
Vermont
Sisco Default
 

OK, this is really a dead horse. 4X4 on pavement= no. No viscous clutch in NV241. 4X4 locks both front and rear axles together, so they don't like turning at different rates=hop. No slip compensation, no clutches, no wrong size tires, nothing. Like the way trucks used to be. Real easy; don't put in 4WD on hard pavement.

+3
Default Ð Awarded
Agree
Helpful
Timothy Owner/Technician
Wisconsin
Timothy Default
 

And that, is that!

0
Default Ð Awarded