Tesla Model S Suspension Noise

Darin Instructor California Posted   Latest   Edited  
Demonstration
Chassis
2017 Tesla Model S 90D 1-spd
Nvh

The vehicle came in for a noise concern. The vehicle makes a rattling type noise from the front end when going over uneven roads at all speeds. Noise is a rattle and sounds like a loose bolt.

Inspection revealed a very common problem. It can happen to all lower links where they mount to the front subframe. In this case, the mounting hole on the subframe for the right front aft link had been elongated due to a possible loose bolt contacting the aluminum subframe. 

The fix is to replace the entire subframe which may require removal of the entire HV battery, front-drive unit and would need to conclude with an alignment. Attached are pics of a good arm and the damaged arm

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Interesting
Craig Owner/Technician
Florida
Craig
 

Darin, Is this a issue that you can deal with in house or are you sending it to Tesla?

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Darin Instructor
California
Darin
 

The things you would need to accomplish this would be: Battery table Drive unit support The ability to perform an alignment on a Tesla

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Don Owner/Technician
Texas
Don
 

I do believe there was a recall for this issue

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Darin Instructor
California
Darin
 

I have not heard of any recall for this. If you have more info on it, I would love to take a look

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Don Owner/Technician
Texas
Don
 

I have one that they did when it was about a year old. 2013 model year

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Darin Instructor
California
Darin
 

Was it a warranty repair or a Tesla Recall?

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Don Owner/Technician
Texas
Don
 

Recall. They came to the shop and verified torque and replaced the bolts.

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Martin Inspector
Louisiana
Martin
 

What did the recall repair consist of?

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Don Owner/Technician
Texas
Don
 

Replaced the bolts and retorque.

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Dan Owner/Technician
Texas
Dan
 

… I see oblong hole up and down in pix #1 and oblong hole left to right in Pix#2…should that hole be a ROUND STRAIGHT hole??…or is in slotted ? … Dan H.

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Agree
David Business Development Manager
Ohio
David
 

I'm with Dan on this one. The two pictures are dissimilar, with the hole elongation being different (neither one is round) and the subframes looking different (the flanged areas don't match). I'm curious why they are different….unless something is missing from the pictures. – Dave

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Eric Owner/Technician
Wisconsin
Eric
   

Dan, put your glasses on ;-) There is no slot in the first picture, just an optical illusion. There is only an elongated round hole with supports cast on either side of it with a little shadow thrown in. A larger picture would be helpful but we have to work with what Darin gave us. Here is a slightly blurry zoomed in area of his picture. diag​.​net/file/f9ize1dq1… ​ Eric

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Helpful
Dan Owner/Technician
Texas
Dan
 

…OK Eric …I can now see the egged out (used to be) round hole in Pix#1…but … Pix #2 sure looks like a clean SLOTTED (L to R) hole ( for adjustment, I reckon)…I still don't see what would be wrong with welding and die grinding it back to what it needs to be…even taking a little off the steel sleeve IN that bushing's END and a fender washer on both sides and tightening the crap out of a new bolt…

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Darin Instructor
California
Darin
 

It should be a slotted hole from left to right, just like the reference pic. The pic of the damaged side shows the oblong hole rounding out

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Dan Owner/Technician
Texas
Dan
 

… Any reason to NOT have it welded by a talented welder and redrilled straight (if it WAS supposed to be a round unslotted hole)…just curious …as always. … Dan H.

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Agree
Harm Technician
Ontario
Harm
 

Or even using alignment washers and using longer bolts. use nylon spacer under the washer

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Paul Owner/Technician
California
Paul
 

Welding was my first thought as well. Weld the slot solid then hand file the straight surfaces. Maybe use a little Dykem on the remaining machined surfaces to avoid filing crooked. I'd probably mill a jig for cutting the slot accurately. I'd worry a little about damage to electronics. I haven't done any TIG on a vehicle while still whole, but I know that the high frequency start can damage…

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Fred Business Development Manager
California
Fred
 

Attorneys.

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Robert Technician
Michigan
Robert
 

Rear Cradle same materials ?

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Darin Instructor
California
Darin
 

Yes, same materials

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Dan Diagnostician
New Jersey
Dan
 

Not that every shop is equipped, but I would build a jig to run an annular cutter or end mill through to the nearest oversize on center and machine steel inserts to press fit in place before I would consider replacing the subframe. I suspect Tesla may even release a repair kit to address these if it becomes that common.

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Dan Owner/Technician
Texas
Dan
 

… Dan's must think alike… I actually thought of that too …but didn't squeak up about it…because the Pix #2 looks as if it is slotted (and I think it is)… I don't see a lot (any) of Tesla platform. … Dan H. … Hobbs

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Funny