Magic 8 ball now magic glasses

Brin from Melbourne Diagnostician Posted   Latest  
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The changes that our industry faces is interesting to say the least. Sometimes it's fun to guess what might stick. 

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Gary from Stuart

 

Manager
 

Interesting, I saw something similar demonstrated at SEMA/APPEX a few years ago. I think it was VDO working on it and the glasses showed Service info, Diagrams and even the location if what bolts to remove for the part that you were replacing. 

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Matthew from Lawrence

 

Technician
 

I remember seeing a video at a training seminar about BMW implementing augmented reality. The glasses double as safety glasses and walked the technician through a R&R step by step, highlighting the parts on the car the needed to be removed. 

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Bruce from Spring Hill

 

Technician
 

I see this leading to further dumb down the industry. Instead of getting training and learning the system, just call tech support with these glasses on and they will literally draw it out for you. 

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Brin from Melbourne

 

Diagnostician
 

The change in this industry is hard to keep up with. I really don't like this concept but I understand that it could end up being a reasonable solution for some auto repair business owners. Technology is advancing at a rapid rate while we struggle to acquire and retain the caliber of individuals needed to properly handle this technology. Companies like Snap On, Farsight and Drew Technologies to name a few, have been paying attention and are now trying to capitalize by offering, what they consider service solutions or resources. Some would argue that these solution based services are band aids and not what the industry needs long term. If I remove bias, I can understand and appreciate where these companies are coming from. I can only hope that these services create learning opportunities for the technicians and shop owners that use them. I can only hope that this doesn't become another crutch. 

Using Augmented Reality with service information could be amazing but I don't think I like where this is going.

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Martin from Burnaby

 

Instructor
 

These seem to surface now and again, being first developed for military use. I recall Holly Pugilise of the US EPA being involved with a similar review and offering trials as early as the late 1990s. However, while the thought is that little more than a "trained chimp", may required to be led through diagnostic and repair procedures, that is a false belief at best. These systems always seem to be demonstrated in the perfect scenarios, rather than real world situations. Many of us know just how well a technician lacking manual dexterity expertise and aptitude might perform when dealing with issues arising from the vehicle having been subjected to in-service wear and tear, corrosion etc. For these reasons alone, augmenting reality may never be the "fix" for the current challenges.

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Albin from Leavenworth

 

Diagnostician
 

Awww come on Martin, you are just worried you might run out of a job training technicians to think and use their head :)

I remember back in the 60's hearing about automation to the manufacturing sector and the predictions about mass amounts of people being put out of work from the automation.

I also remember talking to my Dad about this. (Dad was a millwright in a sawmill). Dad told me that no matter how automated things might get, they would always be the need for someone to fix those machines, and that meant the mechanic being able to think of his feet and figure out things as he worked.

Sound familiar?

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Martin from Burnaby

 

Instructor
 

As you well know, I've never been afraid of change Albin 8-)

My take on this most recent "revelation" that has been taking place since the '90s, is that its going to take a "while" longer to "perfect" enough for mass implementation and in the meantime, we will carry on doing what we do best!

I can just envision it. The manufacturer version will have full features, but the AM version will be like a scan tool, equipped with selected purchases!

BTW, it was good visiting with yourself, Alice, Jay and catching up with the "gang" last weekend. Despite the circumstances, Harv still gets folks hanging out together.

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William from Surrey

 

Owner/Technician
 

And Harv Always will Martin!

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John from San Leandro

 

Business Development Manager
 

Robots have all the necessary dexterity and don't need all the pampering of a human. I can totally see that happening, possibly sooner rather than later. Fixing cars is largely repetitive, humans are mostly not needed, until something abnormal happens, like another human screwing something up.

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Adrean from Bakersfield

 

Diagnostician
 

Would be. nice instead of doing mobile I can guide them from home lol But man is technology advancing quick 

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