Check the codes

Ricardo Diagnostician Plymouth, Michigan Posted   Latest   Edited  
Tech Tip
Driveability
2015 Chrysler 200 C 2.4L (B ED6) 9-spd (948TE)
Crank / No Start

I was called to check the car above .The car was at a shop where a used engine was installed but they could never get it to start , couple of weeks later the owner got it out of there and towed to second shop and they couldn't get it to start either , couple of days later they called me and said " it has to be something electrical because we checked everything and everything is fine" so I get there and do my first scan and right away there's a p2174 Low air flow/restriction detected. I started checking for anything restricting airflow neas air filter and snorkel and nothing . So I manually moved flapper on throttle body to see if maybe a rag was sucked in and there it is. Removed TB , removed plug and car started first try. Why 2 shops with a scanner didn't try to make sense of the code that literally is telling you what's wrong with the car ?

+7
Interesting
Randy Diagnostician
Glendora, California
Randy Default
 

Ha ha yep I have seen that

0 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Robert Diagnostician
Fair Oaks, California
Robert Default
   

Wow! reminds me of the ROP Student(high School Student) that installed a radiator and it kept running hot like the thermostat was stuck. He did not remove the caps on the new radiator and put the hose over it. I had to come over and see what was wrong and ask did you take the cap off? What cap? remove hose... That cap! lol What was the compression readings on the engine with that plug? had to…

0 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Nelson Diagnostician
Gastonia, North Carolina
Nelson Default
 

Saw the same thing on a Lexus a few years back. Newbie installed lower radiator hose over lower outlet shipping plug on new radiator. Kept running hot. I was not made aware of this ongoing situation and later was told it got towed to Toyota dealer where they discovered the RED plug still in place.

0 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Albin Diagnostician
Leavenworth, Washington
Albin Default
 

I would have thought that with a plugged intake, the cranking cadence would sound as if the engine had no compression. Nice find.

+4 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Agree
Ricardo Diagnostician
Plymouth, Michigan
Ricardo Default
 

You're absolutely right Albin, when cranking the engine didn't sound normal

0 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Scott Technician
Chico, California
Scott Default
 

this reminded me of a dodge 5.7 an old coworker did, used engine, the yard we got it from carefully removed the intake, removed the DOD solenoids from the block. put those plastic caps in, reinstalled the intake and torqued the bolts and reconnected the harness. coworker was positive he got a junked engine. we had some very angry words with the yard. they ended up paying us labor and buying all…

0 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Gary Owner/Technician
Buena Vista, Colorado
Gary Default
 

Sounds like the two previous shops couldn't diagnose a dead horse. I'm seeing too many techs make things more complicated than need be. As they say, "Back to thee basics..."

+5 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Agree
Walter Mobile Technician
Plantation, Florida
Walter Default
 

LOL I have seen this before. Shop tech did not remove the plastic plug before installing the throttle body. Unfortunately this is a common issue.

0 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Josh Technician
Lynchburg, Virginia
Josh Default
 

Nicely done

0 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Allan Instructor
Winnipeg, Manitoba
Allan Default
 

Usually it’s the other way around, they get a code with a component name in the description, like EGR code or O2 code and they throw a part at it. I guess this time there was no component named so they didn’t know what to replace. Good catch.

0 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Geoff Diagnostician
Lahaina, Hawaii
Geoff Default
   

Wow, that's crazy. Who would ever think to look BEHIND the throttle plate? Well, I guess YOU did. Very creative thinking! p.s. Good thing you ignored all those warnings to "never move the throttle blade by hand" :-) p.p.s. I think it's better not to throw other techs under the bus in public. Better to blame DIY, when you find a doozy like that.

0 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Ricardo Diagnostician
Plymouth, Michigan
Ricardo Default
 

Whatever makes you happy

+1 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Rudy Technician
Montebello, California
Rudy Default
 

Geoff- any one that says "never move the throttle blade by hand" doesn't know what they are talking about....

+1 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Agree
Geoff Diagnostician
Lahaina, Hawaii
Geoff Default
 

Well somebody started saying that at all the classes, so I'm pretty sure the OE training says that. All about liability, I'm sure. I'm not gonna waste time looking for it. That's the kind of info you can only find when you are NOT looking for it. I love when you tell me every instructor I have had is an idiot. I'm sure they enjoy your opinion too.

0 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Rudy Technician
Montebello, California
Rudy Default
 

Geoff- My guess is "somebody" started saying that in response to the crappy Nissan TBs of the late 90s early 2000s, and that sentiment caught on. The reality is that cleaning of the TB requires pushing the plate open by hand(or removing the TB all together). Toyota has a TSB on the procedure(which I also am not gonna waste time looking for,but its out there) The only time you should never…

0 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Geoff Diagnostician
Lahaina, Hawaii
Geoff Default
   

Since cars normally come into a shop running and with everything plugged in, and a lot of typical visual inspection and DTC scans take place KOEO, I believe they teach it for safety sake. Far safer to say "don't do it". Some used to have stickers that said "do not clean" also. ( IDR MMY.) But "do not clean" is mentioned in most ETC/TAC courses. That is probably to keep guys from pulling it off…

0 Default Ð Bounty Awarded