Trying To Understand Pulse sensor

David Technician California Posted   Latest  

Just received my Nicholsons Pulse Sensor and messing around with it. I'm not sure on the set up been looking in youtube and google but not much info. I posted two attachments. The first one I inverted the waveform and the second I didn't not sure which one is right. When I set up the scope for pulse sensor do I invert the signal or not? Thanks!!!! (pulse sensor connected to brake booster hose. 2005 Ford F-150 4.2L firing order 1-4-2-5-3-6)

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Joe Technician
California
Joe Default
   

I believe the brake booster hose was not a good test location but I could be wrong .. you want a more centralized location like the purge valve vacuum source and i don’t normally invert it

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Tommy Technician
Georgia
Tommy Default
 

I recommend going to tstseminars​.​org and wathing the Brandon Steckler pressure transducer videos.

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Joe Technician
California
Joe Default
 

Didn’t know that was available ... got some stuff to binge tonight lol

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Brandon Diagnostician
Pennsylvania
Brandon Default
 

David, blowing positive pressure into the sensor should force the trace to head north where as a negative pressure should cause the trace to head south

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Benjamin Diagnostician
Tennessee
Benjamin Default
   

David Ruiz, I own a Nicholson sensor myself. Positive change is positive voltage. Negative change is negative voltage.

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Benjamin Diagnostician
Tennessee
Benjamin Default
 

Also it’s hard to get much usable data using a pulse sensor with the engine running. More usable data is captured cranking the engine.

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Niall Owner/Technician
United Kingdom
Niall Default
 

This may sound daft, but I am still learning to interpret these waveform's. Connect up your pulse sensor and simply blow or suck manually, you will see that blowing into the sensor will give a positive voltage but then the voltage seems to bounce into a negative voltage even if no suction has been applied. This was confusing as I thought there was real suction being applied when testing a…

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Brandon Diagnostician
Pennsylvania
Brandon Default
 

Correct, this is a normal operating characteristic of the delta-sensor. I equate it to the analogy of one of those teather-ball paddles. We used as kids. The harder you strike the ball...the faster/further it returns to you . this is EXACTLY why I always suggest to understand the limitations of the tool/test you are performing and to verify the normal operation of the device on a known-good…

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Stephen Technician
Tennessee
Stephen Default
 

I disagree with the tether ball analogy. A tether ball game stores the energy of the struck ball in the elastic tether. The energy is released bringing the ball back but momentum of the ball causes the tether to be re-energized as the ball returns beyond the starting point, or it hits the paddle(but not when I’m doing it). It’s a kind of “ringing” effect that continues until the original energy…

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Brandon Diagnostician
Pennsylvania
Brandon Default
 

Stephen, I can certainly appreciate your point of you and I will not disagree with it. I try to use analogies that will allow a technician to associate what he or she is comfortable with, and somehow tie it to what he or she is trying to absorb.

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Walter Technician
Florida
Walter Default
   

I would suggest you practice on a 4 cylinder first until you get the hang of it then work up to 6 and 8 cylinders. Use a piston chart so you know what's going on.

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David Technician
California
David Update
 

Thanks for the great information. Will also looking into the videos. Brandon, do you come to North California for teaching? Would like to take classes but not much out this way and moneys tight to heard out east. Thanks everyone again I appreciate all the help!

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Brandon Diagnostician
Pennsylvania
Brandon Default
 

David, I will take my class anywhere in the world that there is an interest. Message me for details if you would like

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Joe Technician
California
Joe Default
 

I’m also in northern ca and an extremely interested

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Brandon Diagnostician
Pennsylvania
Brandon Default
 

I’d be happy to hold a class out there. Feel free to message me/email me and we can discuss this further 👍

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Joe Technician
California
Joe Default
 

Whats your email?

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Brandon Diagnostician
Pennsylvania
Brandon Default
 

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Jonathan Educator
California
Jonathan Default
   

David; Good afternoon i hope this email finds you doing well. Attached is a Case Study I just completed using Cranking Amps Relative Compression along with Cranking Vacuum. This case study was completed simply with the engine cranking. Pulse sensors are a much needed accessory in diagnostics because of the complexity of today's modern engines. As more and more manufactures go to DHOC Camshaft…

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