Nissan Consult III Needed For SRS Module Replacement

Michael from Clinton Mobile Technician Posted   Latest  
Discussion
Collision
2017 Nissan Murano SL 3.5L (A VQ35DE) (RE0F10J)

Yesterday I worked on a 2017 Nissan Murano that the body shop had just completed. The customer complaint was that the airbag lamp was on after replacing the blown airbag components. When pulling the codes, one of them was an ECU configuration code. It took some research, but it was discovered that the newer Nissan vehicles require that the old SRS control module info be uploaded to the Consult tool then programmed into the replacement module. 

The new module had been replaced before all the diagnostic errors were addressed. From what was observed, the best practice is to keep the old SRS module in place until all diagnostic codes are corrected. I would suspect there would be a deployment code that would remain. What resulted from changing the module prior to all diagnostic codes being addressed is that the codes seem to be permanently burned into the module as history codes. They do not seem to effect the SRS function or the light. Future technicians may see the codes and go down the wrong path in diagnosing future problems.

After reinstalling the original SRS, the information was read and stored into the Consult tool then pushed into the new reinstalled SRS module. Unfortunately codes were stored from the faulty components that had not been changed when the new module was first installed. The codes were able to be cleared to a History state. They appear to be permanent.

The lesson here is to leave the old module in until all airbag components are working properly. Then the info can be read into the consult tool and pushed to the replacement module. The days of the plug and play modules seem to be over. Previous to the Consult, I tried the Autel and Autoland Scientech tools. I could not find a coding / programming feature in either tool. It appears that the factory tool is required for newer Nissan vehicles. Maybe some of you know more info on this. Your comments are appreciated.

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Cesar from Garland

 

Owner/Technician
 

I did a 2017 Nissan Altima that also have the Airbag Module already replaced, and I was able to connect the old module and do the Programming / Configuration with out any problems. Are you sure the module that you installing is new or maybe someone tried it to virginize that module?

Or possible that the vehicle still have some problems, I'm wondering how a system can burn the codes from one Module into the New with out any special function to be carried out.

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Steven from Commack

 

Technical Support Specialist
 

Coming from Nissan and Infiniti over the past 20+ years. Both manufacturers never really wanted anything diagnosed in there air bag systems. If the code was stored in "past" or "current" the manufacturer had a set number of parts that need to be replaced depending on the code. Usually it was always the SRS module plus the parts affected, if there was any connector damage, absolutely no repair attempt was to be made on the harness, the harness would need replacement. Outside service facilities did not have this information and would replace the effected part(s) not knowing the new module they purchased came blank. Plug and Play is now over on Nissan / Infiniti above 2003 MY. Some modules may still come with data. MOST are blank. Certain modules need to be programmed and others need the data saved and transferred to new module. As far as i have seen with Nissan / Infiniti vehicles only the Consult III was capable of performing these functions of coding or programming depending on the module replaced prior to 2018.

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Michael from Clinton

 

Mobile Technician
 

Thanks Steven,

I had no idea that the SRS / Airbag modules came blank after 2003. I thought it was a new phenomenon. It is strange that this has not come up before with the body shops. Normally we are only asked to reset the occupant seat. This function is found in the Autel and Autoland Scientech tool. The Engine ECUs and Transmission modules have been hit or miss. Normally we have had success with the J Box software in programming them. Doing on-site programming is a constant learning experience.

+1

Steven from Commack

 

Technical Support Specialist
 

Hi Michael,

Initially it did not start like that. As they progressed into "blank" programming. Previous model years were added into the "blank" world. Much easier to produce and ship a blank unit then sending it off the line to have it programmed, saved time and money so they adopted it to earlier model years as they could. Body shops most of the time would just bring in the vehicles to have the modules programmed as a Consult III factory tool can program modules without the need of the original module. Factory Consult III tools utilize and work in conjunction with Asist where anyone outside of the dealer world has a Consult III unit without the "extra"(Asist) program as well as utilizing the parts department for Programming ID's with lost or missing original modules

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Bob from East Longmeadow

 

Diagnostician
 

Sometimes the original module can be damaged or have a no comm issue. I would guess that there has to be a workaround for these situations, otherwise you would end up with a lot of unfix-able cars no?

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Steven from Commack

 

Technical Support Specialist
 

Yes Bob. That is where the Consult III tool must be used. Between the factory tool and a programming ID. The only way you would get that software for a damaged or communication issue internal in the module is with a Consult III tool used at a dealership. Although a Consult III tool purchased for an outside shop can program like a dealer tool. The addition of Asist to a factory Consult III adds software for damaged, no communication modules as well as service manuals, database searches., etc..

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Bob from East Longmeadow

 

Diagnostician
 

I would think a shop with the consult III, an LSID and a subscription should be able to do this procedure. If that's not the case it's good to know. It sucks, but good to know.

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David from Ambler

 

Owner/Technician
 

This is standard on module replacement for Nissan/Infinity​.​If possible leave the old module in and change to the new when prompted by the tool​.​If not your local dealer can usually help with the configuration part number.

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Bryan from Fort Walton Beach

 

Technician
 

Kinda odd on the codes, I have had to let the module power up and then power down a time or two before I could get the codes to clear but I dont think I have done one that I could not clear the codes.

Programming I think Nissan is having growing pains when it comes to module programming, Asist does not have the calibration info in it most of blank programming

you have to go to FAST for the correct calibration number. Until you get to the SRS module on a newer Rogue that you have to carry a thumb drive to parts and download the calibration for the C3+. Kinda crazycw

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Cesar from Garland

 

Owner/Technician
 

Michael I'm also wondering if the both Modules was bolted down and grounded when it was disconnected... Friend of mine told me a story of a shop, one of his customers connected the Module with out grounding and the Airbags deployed, and actually the one I did was a 2017 Maxima not and Altima.

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