Navigation inoperative after Body Domain Controller (BDC) replacement

Nelson from Commack Technical Support Specialist Posted   Latest  
Case Study
Programming
2017 BMW X6 xDrive35i 3.0L (N55B30A) 8-spd (GA8HP45Z)—5UXKU2C34H0X47643
Navigiation
Speech Recognition
Satellite Radio
B7f87a Hu-H: Component Protection Active
80410B Aerial
Driver's Side: Line Disconnection

Preface : 

The vehicle was recently repaired at a body shop because it was side swiped along the whole drivers side. The body shop's concern was that the remote key functions would not work.

Problem :

There were many low voltage codes in virtually every module which is is not surprising since the vehicle was at the body shops for weeks. After checking the charging system and replacing the battery, the only fault come that came back was a "80410B Aerial, driver's side: Line disconnection". This fault code directs you to check the drivers outside comfort access antenna (Component E23) which is located behind the drivers side rocker panel. This was not a big surprise since that was the area where the vehicle was hit. After checking the antennae (looked new) and verifying the wiring to it from the Body Domain Controller, it was time to condemn the BDC. I ordered a BDC from the dealership and installed it. I programmed and coded the BDC with an … Assist Plus. The 80410B fault code was gone but a new issue appeared and its name was “B7F87A HU-H: Component protection active”.

If you service Volkswagens, you probably know what this term means. To protect against theft, BMW introduced component protection on the Head Unit High (HU-H2) of the specified vehicles with production date as of November 2016. This function was coupled to the Body Domain Controller (BDC). So in other words if the vehicle has a HU-H2 and a BDC then you will run into this issue if the circumstances align.

Since the BDC was replaced, the car automatically locked out the navigation functions, speech recognition, and satellite radio. It didn’t care that the head unit was original to the car, it say a new Body Domain Controller went into component protection. According to BMW repair document 61 35 278, swapping a used BDC or HU-H for testing will give you the same fault code!

After doing some more research, the only way to remove the component protection is through ISPI Next which calls home to germany to retrieve a “Deblocking Enabling Code”. So i hooked up ISPI Next and made a measures plan for replacement of the BDC and saw that the ISPI Next programmed the BDC correctly but failed at SWT (Sweeping Technologies - SWT is basically an encrypted enabling code to activate “locked” functions in the vehicle).

So what now?

I contacted BMW and they stated that the vehicle will need to have an iRAP session performed to insert the deblocking enabling code into the vehicle. (An iRAP session is a process in which BMW remotely programs, codes, and/or performs diagnostic functions that aren’t available to the dealer network or aftermarket. )

Fix:

The vehicle was sent to the closest BMW dealership and they repeated the same programming measures plan i performed. BMW Germany was contacted and they remotely created the enabling deblocking code and inserted it into the vehicle via iRAP.

Conclusion:

So what is the moral of this story?

Remember, all of this happened because of a simple door lock issue.

Even when using Factory Equipment (ISPI Next) and Factory Level Equipment (…), it seems that the aftermarket repair industry will always be dependent on the dealership network when it comes to certain late model repairs.

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Maynard from Elmira

 

Technician
 

Wow that is some pretty interesting stuff. Very good on the walk through.....and I look at that as, "o well, if it needs some dealership intervention, thats ok," and we can maybe do that step for our clients anyway rather than them going to get it looked after at the dealership.

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Rudy from Montebello

 

Technician
 

Great, detailed, informative post. Appreciate it Nelson.

+2

James from Pike

 

Diagnostician
 

Great information but I look at this and wonder if it's more a way to side step the Right to repair Act in the

name of Securing and Protecting Company's Intellectual Property Rights

I hope not.

+2

Nelson from Commack

 

Technical Support Specialist
 

I just spent a week a …'s UK office fielding technical support calls and it was blatantly obvious that Europe has an issue with stolen parts. It totally makes sense that BMW put an anti theft mechanism for these BDC and Headunit modules. The issue is that i'm sure the thieves will find a way around this and the aftermarket will be left holding the bag.

BMW just released some information on this issue. 

For vehicles with the (FEM) gateway module:

Current ISTA software will not load the enable codes. The enable codes must be loaded by the IRAP team (only the dealer can do this and the vehicle has to be at the dealer) via remote programming.

Contact Technical Support via PuMA requesting creation of the enabling codes and an IRAP session to load the codes.

For vehicles with the (BDC) gateway module:

Contact Technical Support via PuMA (only the dealer can do this and the vehicle has to be at the dealer), who will generate the required enabling codes for the head unit. After receiving the codes via the ASAP portal, install them on a USB stick and run the function "initialization of head unit component protection" in ISTA. 

So the vehicle still needs to go to the dealer!

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