Suzuki push button start

Justin Mobile Technician Herriman, Utah Posted   Latest  
Case Study
Security
2010 Suzuki Kizashi GTS 2.4L (9 J24B)—JS2RE9A52A6100337
Security Theft / No Start

This is a story about ignorance and arrogance blocking the ability to fix a car. The car in question is a 2010 Suzuki Kizashi. This car was originally at an independent facility. This shop attempted to perform a battery test as part of a routine vehicle inspection. The battery tester wouldn’t perform the test giving a connection error. So the tech disconnected the battery cables to get a good positive connection directly to the battery. Test performed, battery test results were good. No need for a new battery sale at this point. 

The trouble started after the battery was reconnected. At this point they could not turn the push button start ignition back on. No amount of pushing/holding down the button, key placement would work. Dash is dark except for a key symbol. It’s unclear to me how the vehicle ended at the shop that I was asked to look at it. This time it was at the Suzuki dealership 50 miles away. The story I received was the dealership had attempted to find the issue and failed to fix it. 

I arrived at the dealership to attempt to find a solution for the first shop that asked me to help. It’s always uncomfortable to walk into a dealerships service department and ask for the keys to the vehicle they could fix. I get the keys and location of the car with an attitude. They clearly didn’t believe I could possibly bring anything to the table. Fire lit! I find the car with a plastic bag attempting to hold the weather out of the stuck down drivers window. Nothing on when I open the door. Hood open I visually inspect the battery and connections looking for what could possibly have happened with the battery testing. All looks in order. Test light out I put one end on the negative and the other on positive. Nothing. Jump box attached I proceed to touch fuses. I’m not testing fuses here just seeing how dead the main fuse box is next to the battery. Almost every fuse shows power. I determine that I don’t believe the issue to be a battery connection at this point. 

Next I go back into the vehicle to see what works. Key buttons pushed, locks cycle. Door switches lock and unlock the doors. Dome lights function. Nothing else appears to power up. There are no lights on the push button when depressed. I verify all the ways I know to cycle these switches, key pushing the button, hold the button for a period of time, multiple pushes. Nothing ever happens except a key light on the instrument cluster. Ok let’s look at a power distribution wiring diagram.

Just as I start to look over the diagrams the technician at the dealership walks out to the back lot where I am. He proceeds to tell me he knows the problem and it can’t be fixed. Ok I am listening. He tells me the problem is the prox keys are not registered to the vehicle and that he spent over 5 hours working on this problem. He proceeds to tell me that he worked with the manufactures help support. They told him how to jump power to 3 wires on the BCM to power up the ignition. He wouldn’t tell me what wires more on that later. He said first the RKE function didn’t work but they got them learned. He said the keys require the latest and greatest factory tool. The dealership apparently feels it is not necessary equipment for the brand they have on the big lit up sign out front. He says without that the manufacturer would not give their blessing in the form of a security access code to program the keys. He insisted the older tool would if they just had the code. So basically they can’t be learned he said. Ok challenge accepted.

I look at the wiring diagram that I am attaching here for the keyless module showing the connections to the BCM. It didn’t take long to figure out if I put power on 7,8 and 27 the 3 relays would power up the ignition circuits. They did. At this point it was just a matter of connecting one of my locksmith programming tools. Well almost. The model I am working on isn’t listed. I pick model after model until I find one the doesn’t “fail to connect” run through the menu options, find a program all keys lost. Hold key up to button and push ok. Perform this procedure for both prox keys. Report back is successfully added two key. Total of two keys are learned to the vehicle. Ok disconnect my jumper wires and cycle the push button. Dash lights up. Push the clutch in and start up the engine. The best part was the look on the service advisor and all the techs when I produced a running car in about an hour. I have never understood the attitude I have seen from dealership techs throughout my decades in this industry. 

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Dean Owner
Albany, New York
Dean Default
 

Justin, Good for you! Thinking outside the box and the ability to work around a problem is inspiring. Keep up the great work, and thanks for sharing this. Great story!

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Todd Mobile Technician
Morinville, Alberta
Todd Default
 

Awesome write up! And yeah, its about fixing the car, not engaging in a pissing contest. I can barely abide some of the crap attitude or just plain ignorance I encounter. Good job man!

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Selvin Diagnostician
Novato, California
Selvin Default
 

Yeah people at the dealerships think they know everything. Justin you said you applied power to pins 7,8 and 27 but looking at the diagram that's the ground control for the relays correct me if I'm wrong

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Justin Mobile Technician
Herriman, Utah
Justin Default
 

Ground is on pin 1

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Scott Owner
Moreno Valley, California
Scott Default
 

Hi Justin, Good job getting the car going! A few thoughts and questions, in no particular order. Suzuki must not be like GM. Any tool deemed essential is shipped automatically and the dealer principle gets the bill. That's an odd scenario where the manufacturer has the access code, but won't give it to an authorized dealer because they don't have the correct tooling?? Odd... No good deed…

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Justin Mobile Technician
Herriman, Utah
Justin Default
 

I can‘t speak to the way the dealerships run their operations as I have never worked in one. I thought it was very odd they would not have the correct tooling for the makes they have on the signs. I have no reason for why the keys were forgotten by the car. I wouldn’t pay a dime for the 5 hours they say they put into it. I’m sorry but throwing your hands in the air and saying it can’t be done…

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Scott Owner
Moreno Valley, California
Scott Default
 

Hi Justin, That is the strange part of this that the manufacturer doesn't ensure that they're equipped to repair the cars they sell. The only other thing I wanted to add was your final statement wasn't fair - "I have never understood the attitude I have seen from dealership techs throughout my decades in this industry." They don't know you from Adam, but statistically speaking, they have a…

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Anthony Technical Support Specialist
Kirkwood, Pennsylvania
Anthony Default
 

Hi Scott: Tis my understanding that Suzuki pulled the plug on US sales over 7 years ago. A dealership not having tooling or service information is not that far fetched. When UD pulled the plug around the same time, the only dealers with access were those with the newer franchise agreements guaranteeing them OEM support for 10 years. We saw how well that worked out. This is not meant to take…

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Geoff Diagnostician
Lahaina, Hawaii
Geoff Default
 

I think the key there is your statement, "At this point it was just a matter of connecting one of my locksmith programming tools". Anyone working at a dealer for all their career, would have no clue that stuff exists. They have SI and TechLine and that is the end of the road unless the engineer team gets sent out. If it was new they'd probably buy it back and sell a new car. But in this case it…

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Michael Mobile Technician
Clinton, Utah
Michael Default
 

Scott, The established Suzuki dealer for our area pulled up stakes. The mentioned dealer picked up the pieces and all the Suzuki dealer business. They have since found that this car line is not profitable and don't plan on continuing to repair this car line. This is why they do not have the latest software and don't want to invest in it. It reminds me of what happened when Saturn went away.

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Richard Technician
Stony Brook, New York
Richard Default
 

As I was reading the original post I was thinking how surprised I was that there is a dealer even touching these vehicles. That's not to say I think Suzukis are bad. I actually thought they were pretty decent vehicles for a pretty cheap price. My mom had a Suzuki Esteem for a couple of years. I don't think anything ever went wrong with it. I cant imagine there is a lot of Suzuki business out…

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Paul Mechanic
Harvey, Illinois
Paul Default
 

Awesome job, but to be fair because I've worked both sides of the fence, the tech probably isn't all that motivated. He or she can't override what the manager may dictate on how much time can be expended on it or what procedures he/she is allowed to attempt, and finally, maybe just doesn't care, because there's a line of vehicles waiting and his/her compensation is there same amount at end of…

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Michael Mobile Technician
Clinton, Utah
Michael Default
 

Justin, I find it quite humorous that in coming out to tell you that you won't be able to fix the problem the technician actually gave you a great clue to solving the problem. Having the right technology paired with patience and experience got it done. Great Work!

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Robert Technician
Trevose, Pennsylvania
Robert Default
 

I work for a company that sells used auto parts and part of my job is diagnosing problems after the customer calls back and says “That motor you sold me is no good”. Some people are grateful they don’t have to pull the engine again but some have real attitudes and this is mainly independent shops. (I find about 50% of our “bad engines” are really bad) I have been trying to remember with the…

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Tomi Diagnostician
Chicago, Illinois
Tomi Default
 

So basically what your saying is the tech did diagnose the vehicle properly but unfortunately most dealer tools will not pull pins or bypass them. At this point Suzuki is not in North America so they have no access to the pin. Tools like the APP and the IM will do the bypass for you. Basically sucks the dealer was put in a hard place. Glad your were able to program the keys for them!

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Justin Mobile Technician
Herriman, Utah
Justin Default
 

Yep he basically fixed it🙄. That’s why I was called to do the job. It was pushed to the very back lot where it was planned to be forgotten about.

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Tomi Diagnostician
Chicago, Illinois
Tomi Default
 

Good job!

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Bob Owner/Technician
East Longmeadow, Massachusetts
Bob Default
 

It was 80% better right? ;-)

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Richard Technician
Stony Brook, New York
Richard Default
 

And just think the customer is probably all happy they got back their Suzuki Hibachi or Takehashmi. Whatever the heck that thing is.

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Albert Owner/Technician
Towanda, Pennsylvania
Albert Default
   

Just goes to show the dealer and/or dealer techs are not always the best choice.

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