AC Leaks

Justin Owner/Technician Bloomfield, Indiana Posted   Latest   Edited  

Looking at upping my ac game. With 1234yf coming. What nitrogen leak testers are you guys using and do sniffers work with them? And what other tools are you using for ac leaks. Thanks guys.

0
Pete Technician
Zephyrhills, Florida
Pete
 

You should check into this: aeswave​.​com/BULLSEYE-Leak… This can be used to test for ANY kind of leak - not just A/C. You may also be interested in a webinar we just hosted on service challenges associated with R1234yf. You can watch it here: ubmadvanstar​.​hs-sites​.​com/watch-servicin… It is a PPV offer.

+1 Ð Bounty Awarded
Tim Technician
Reading, Pennsylvania
Tim
 

I would recommend against nitrogen. No light duty OEM currently recommends the use of nitrogen for leak detection. Every OEM supports the use of electronic leak detectors and all but Toyota currently support the use of UV dye with most installing it from the factory. Success with an electronic detector comes down to technique and making the leak leak. Success with dye boils down to your light

+3 Ð Bounty Awarded
Jim Curriculum Developer
Frederick, Maryland
Jim
 

Tim, I agree with you on getting comfortable with a good leak detector. I learned to trust one I had years ago and still have though it does not meet current standards. We became friends though! :) Just food for thought and NOT to suggest not getting one of the new, fantastic offerings, I shot a video of my old unit testing on a calibrated leak. That unit is OLD and not as stable as newer

-1 Ð Bounty Awarded
Justin Owner/Technician
Bloomfield, Indiana
Justin
 

Thanks for the video. my dad has allows done the ac work. And he’s not a new age kinda guy. Lol. I have been learning diag and programming last few years and now ac is becoming to much for him so to speak. Now I have to learn the in and outs

0 Ð Bounty Awarded
Orlando Technician
Toronto, Ontario
Orlando
 

What's the issue with using nitrogen? Thanks.

+1 Ð Bounty Awarded
Pete Technician
Zephyrhills, Florida
Pete
 

Tim's comment reminded me of something I should have included in my comment. If you do use an inert gas to help you find leaks, you must be sure that it is completely removed prior to recharging the system. @TimIezzi - I'm guessing that's why the OEMs do not recommend the practice?

0 Ð Bounty Awarded
Jim Curriculum Developer
Frederick, Maryland
Jim
 

First of all, having used and tested quite a few J2791 and J2913 leak detectors I can tell you they are accurate and capable of detecting very small leaks without flagging on everything under the hood. There are many times I have found leaks in systems that were dye treated but the leak was in a location that was not conducive to a dye stain. Think high on an evaporator with parallel flow for

+2 Ð Bounty Awarded
Robert Owner/Technician
Washington, New Jersey
Robert
 

I have the Bullseye kit Myself. I have not had a chance to use it on an A/C system yet. But It works great with EVAP leaks and head gaskets.. And so much more. I would at least check out the videos at ate Automotive test solution site

0 Ð Bounty Awarded
Jim Curriculum Developer
Frederick, Maryland
Jim
 

Hi Robert! Was your reply intended to be to me or the the OP? We have the Bullseye where I work. Pete mentioned it. The original question asked about nitrogen testing so that was how I formed my answer. Just making sure I didn't miss something.

0 Ð Bounty Awarded
Robert Owner/Technician
Washington, New Jersey
Robert
 

First time trying to add to the conversation. meant for the OP

0 Ð Bounty Awarded
G Educator
Mahopac, New York
G
 

Justin I have been using BullsEye CO2 system that works great. Since CO2 is a smaller molecule the leak is easier to find. With R1234yf being so expensive we pressure test the system with 200 psi of CO2 and use the ATS leaker detector tool. Once we locate the area we spray the BullysEye form to make sure it turns from pink to a yellow color. That confirms the exact area of the leak. Check out

-1 Ð Bounty Awarded
Tim Owner/Technician
Wilmington, North Carolina
Tim
 

Thanks "G" for the recommendation on the Bullseye Leak Detector. Works great for Evap, A/C, and Head Gaskets. P.S. The webinar with you and Pete was great. Definitely picked up a few tips. Hope to see you soon in future training seminars.

0 Ð Bounty Awarded
G Educator
Mahopac, New York
G
 

Tim glad we could be of help. The ATS BullysEye really does work as you now know first hand. Hope to see you in a future class.

0 Ð Bounty Awarded
Tim Owner/Technician
Wilmington, North Carolina
Tim
 

Hi Justin. I have to agree with "G" and Pete on the Bullseye leak detector. I recently attended a training class with "G" and purchased the CO2 kit with A/C adapters for R134a and 1234yf. The tools works great just make sure you have a separate vaccum pump to remove any residual CO2 from the system before you hook up your new, expensive a/c machine.

0 Ð Bounty Awarded
Jasper Technician
Fort Collins, Colorado
Jasper
 

Hey Tim, when you evacuate the co2, are you reclaiming it to a dedicated tank for future use with the Bullseye, or does it become contaminated and need to be recycled or something?

0 Ð Bounty Awarded
Tim Owner/Technician
Wilmington, North Carolina
Tim
 

Hey Jasper. Due to the risk of contamination we do not reuse the CO2. At my shop we use a larger CO2 tank from Airgas. The bullseye leak detector kit comes with the tank adapter but you do have to buy the a/c hoses seperate.

0 Ð Bounty Awarded
Mike Mobile Technician
Mount Pleasant, South Carolina
Mike
 

For large leaks, I dont think leak detectors would be wise. Whether you are concerned about the environment or about the cost of R1234YF it just doesnt make sense. I have used nitrogen to successfully find large leaks many times but it obviously wouldn't be ideal for smaller leaks. Nitrogen also does not require a large investment and has a few other uses in the shop. One important use AM

+2 Ð Bounty Awarded
G Educator
Mahopac, New York
G
 

Mike as you stated large leaks are easy to find, it's the small ones that do you in and cost bucks. I used nitrogen years back with a ultrasound detector but the small leaks were not always easy to find. I have been thrilled using CO2 since I was able to use my 5 gas with a short hose and locate most of the small leaks. Now with BullysEye it easier and fast to locate the exact leak whether it's

0 Ð Bounty Awarded
Jim Curriculum Developer
Frederick, Maryland
Jim
   

Hi Mike, Are you using straight nitrogen or are you using the trace gas? The reason I ask is because of leak size conversation. I checked and found the detector in the kit I referenced meets the J2970 standard. That standard covers the use of a "trace gas" instead of a conventional detector that meets J2913. To be approved, the alternate method must detect a leak at an equivalent g/year rate…

0 Ð Bounty Awarded
Mike Mobile Technician
Mount Pleasant, South Carolina
Mike
   

I'm using straight nitrogen. For large leaks it works great and because it has multiple other uses I have been more than happy with it. I would dare to say that because of how new 1234 systems are a majority of the leak diagnostics being performed today will be collision related large leaks. My company operates mobile which may deviate from the norm but I can tell you that 100% of the 1234yf

+2 Ð Bounty Awarded