Pre and post scan

Maynard Technician Elmira, Ontario Posted   Latest  

Hi everyone

This may be a newbie question or questions. However, would someone humour me and educate me on what is involved with pre and post scanning please? I have seen that term in many posts (usually more so around collision work) 

A couple questions, 1. Is this something that is done with factory scantools or primarily aftermarket tools? 2. is the pre and post scan basically an all modules scan before any work is done then again after work completed, or is it a much more in depth scan including crash data, freeze frames etc? 3. Is this scan done by a facility and recorded in their own data base or is this a scan function which is done online and connected to some ministry of transportation database? Is a special scantool required specifically for pre and post scan? 4. Is this something which will become a requirement for the repair shop when alignments and calibrations are done on ADAS systems during routine repairs of non functional systems?

+1
Luis Technician
Lake Forest, California
Luis Default
 

I have seen it more in the auto body collision shops now and started to be a requirement by some insurance companies to prevent lawsuits and for the safety of the customer. It can be done with or without oem factory scan tool with the exemption of New Chrysler vehicles and yes is a all module scan print out before and after repairs some shops have the capability to do it some don’t and they call

+1 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Maynard Technician
Elmira, Ontario
Maynard Default
 

Ok, thats cool. So an observatory question from that. Aftermarket tools have all kinds of different capability levels..... however, sometimes aftermarket tools are not able to communicate with all available modules, or possibly they don't even show up in the list as an option to scan (trailer brake module) If this is the case, is there any disqualifications from the insurance companies? Or will

0 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Eric Owner/Technician
Peoria, Illinois
Eric Default
   

Hello, First point I would make make that pre /post scans are definitely a benefit the insurance industry but it is driven by the position statements and following the OE recommended service procedures (sound familiar...err JE...) Get ready for the OE tool vs "aftermarket tools can do just as well" debate on this topic as well. Position statements can be accessed

+3 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Robert Engineer
Durham, North Carolina
Robert Default
 

Hello Eric, What you say is absolutely correct. The all modules thing is important since you could easily overlook or miss something. The risks are really low, but in this risk adverse climate and legal system we get what we get. Sometimes I do believe that the risk argument is taken beyond reasonable assumptions as a method to capture more work, or more money for the work. The idea of it "has

+1 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Eric Owner/Technician
Peoria, Illinois
Eric Default
 

Hi Robert, Good to hear from you. I just grab MB quote as a quick reference. Here's the last to party's- Ford's "It is important to utilize Ford repair procedures for all collision repairs to ensure quality results. Ford also recommends the use of the Integrated Diagnostic System (IDS) or Ford Diagnosis and Repair System (FDRS) to perform all vehicle diagnostic testing, module programing…

0 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Robert Engineer
Durham, North Carolina
Robert Default
 

Eric, Nice to see you here too! I have not been following along much so this may have been mentioned in other posts on various websites. The second element to using to OE tools is what happens behind the scenes. There is much going on which is not exposed to the users, and even less understood by much of the industry. When your tool logs into a website data is transferred back to the

+1 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Avery Technician
Kansas City, Missouri
Avery Default
 

Eric, great points, something I would like to add. Since a large portion of customers have their oil changes and services done at an Independent shop, or Jiffy Lube type place, all warranties would be voided even after the first oil change. I have never seen a shop use only OE filters and Fluids for basic routine maintenance. Even things like air filters and the like would not be falling into

-1 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Bob Owner/Technician
East Longmeadow, Massachusetts
Bob Default
   

There is legislation that addresses some of this, specifically the Magnuson/Moss Act. The relevant part is in the paragraph "Tie-In Sales" Provisions.

0 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Bill Owner/Technician
Jackson, Michigan
Bill Default
 

Thanks for that link Eric!

0 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Anthony Technical Support Specialist
Kirkwood, Pennsylvania
Anthony Default
   

Hi Maynard: 1: OE tools do what they do. Aftermarket tools claims to do things. If you are sure the claim is true then ok, have at it. It unsure then.... 2: Pre & post scan have been done for years. The problem is that it hasn't been done by everyone when it should've been done. It is true that insurance companies are behind the push now for their own reasons. for liability reasons, they

0 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Kevin Technician
Winnipeg, Manitoba
Kevin Default
 

I don’t care what aftermarket tool you want to use it will fall short .... the professionals that use both OEM and aftermarket tools know of the lack of module coverage aftermarket tools can have. The meat and potatoes here is even if it’s let’s says 1% of the time the ”aftermarket tool“ fails to read a module... then it’s essentially failed a pre and post scan... period. How insurance companies

+2 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
John Owner
Medford, New York
John Default
 

Kevin, Great point! I have a body shop that consistently does pre scans with a well known aftermarket scantool on late model Ford products. It never picks up OCSM (Occupant Classification System Module). So when I go there to program the recently replaced RCM I do a full scan and guess what? We have a code in OCSM for crash detected system locked necessitating an OCSM replacement. Some of

+1 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Avery Technician
Kansas City, Missouri
Avery Default
 

Typically, what I do is grab my scan tool (Autel) and start the car, while doing this I plug in my scanner and perform a full system scan (talking to all modules). I then go into Generic mode and check my Mode 6 data to see what test are showing as a failure (Autel will mark these as Test Result: Failed). I print out all this data and then perform my test drive. Having this record will help you

-2 Default Ð Bounty Awarded
Michael Diagnostician
Holt, Michigan
Michael Default
 

My position is they are absolutely necessary in the repair of the vehicle to a precrash condition. Yes they could be used on the repair side as well to know if the repair you performed caused other issues or not. For body shops it is critical to know what was there before repairs were made and what remains after repair is complete. OEM tooling should be the only choice as these tools is what was

0 Default Ð Bounty Awarded