Passenger Power Window Intermittent operation, A/C inoperative

Robby from New Market Mobile Technician Posted   Latest  
Case Study
Network Communications
Electrical
2016 Ford Fusion S 2.5L (7) 6-spd (6F35)—3FA6P0G73GR231239
U0200 - Lost Communication With "Door Control Module B"
U0256 - Lost Communication With Front Controls Interface Module "A"
U0140 - Lost Communication With Body Control Module
U0155 - Lost Communication With Instrument Panel Cluster (IPC) Control Module
U0557 - Invalid Data Received From Front Controls Interface Module "A"
B0070 - Driver Seat Belt Pretensioner "A" Deployment Control
B007E - Driver Seat Belt Pretensioner "C" Deployment Control
B1193 - Crash Event Storage Full And Locked
B1408:13-Af- (Rcm)- Passenger Side Curtain Deployment Control 1 - Circuit Open
U3000:49-E8- (Rcm)- Control Module - Internal Electronic Failure - Indeterminate

2016 Ford Fusion VIN: 3FA6P0G73GR231239 Miles: 42488

Customer’s concern: Passenger power window intermittent, A/C inoperative 

Upon initial inspection, both concerns were present. I also noticed the airbag light was illuminated, but the customer was only worried about the A/C and power windows. 

I started diagnostics by performing a vehicle DTC scan. However, after DTCs were retrieved, the A/C and power windows started working.

The following DTCs were present:

All (CMDTCs)

  • Pass - (ABS)
  • Pass - (ACM)
  • Pass - (APIM)
  • Pass - (DDM)
  • Pass - (GPSM)
  • Pass - (GWM)
  • Pass - (OCSM)
  • Pass - (PCM)
  • Pass - (PSCM)
  • Pass - (RTM)
  • Pass - (SCCM)

U0200:87-0A- (BCM)- Lost Communication With Door Control Module B - Missing Message -Current (DTC), Fault is currently present.

U0256:87-0A- (BCM)- Lost Communication With Front Controls Interface Module - Missing Message - Current (DTC), Fault is currently present.

U0256:00-08- (FCDIM) - Lost Communication With Front Controls Interface Module - No Additional Failure Type Information for this (DTC) - Not Current (DTC), Fault previously detected, not currently present.

U0140:00-08- (FCIM)- Lost Communication With Body Control Module - No Additional Failure Type Information for this (DTC) - Not Current (DTC),Fault previously detected, not currently present.

U0155:00-08- (FCIM)- Lost Communication With Instrument Panel Cluster Control Module - No Additional Failure Type Information for this (DTC) - Not Current (DTC),Fault previously detected, not currently present.

U0557:81-08- (IPC)- Invalid Data Received From Front Controls Interface Module - Invalid Serial Data Received - Not Current (DTC),Fault previously detected, not currently present.

U0557:82-0A- (IPC)- Invalid Data Received From Front Controls Interface Module - Alive/Sequence Counter Incorrect/Not Updated - Current (DTC),Fault is currently present.

U0140:00-08- (PDM)- Lost Communication With Body Control Module - No Additional Failure Type Information for this (DTC) - Not Current (DTC),Fault previously detected, not currently present.

B0070:13-AF- (RCM)- Driver Seatbelt Pretensioner Deployment Control - Circuit Open - Current (DTC) - Warning Lamp On,Fault is currently present, warning lamp on ((MIL), Wrench, Message Center, etc.).

B007E:13-AF- (RCM)- Driver Seatbelt Pretensioner C Deployment Control - Circuit Open - Current (DTC) - Warning Lamp On,Fault is currently present, warning lamp on ((MIL), Wrench, Message Center, etc.).

B1193:00-AF- (RCM)- Crash Event Storage Full and Locked - No Additional Failure Type Information for this (DTC) - Current (DTC) - Warning Lamp On, Fault is currently present, warning lamp on ((MIL), Wrench, Message Center, etc.).

B1408:13-AF- (RCM)- Passenger Side Curtain Deployment Control 1 - Circuit Open - Current (DTC) - Warning Lamp On, Fault is currently present, warning lamp on ((MIL), Wrench, Message Center, etc.).

U3000:49-E8- (RCM)- Control Module - Internal Electronic Failure - Indeterminate - Warning Lamp On, Fault previously detected but monitor has not completed to determine state, with warning lamp on ((MIL), Wrench, Message Center, etc.).

Since the fault preventing AC/Power window operation cleared up on its own, I now had to gather as much information as I could just from the DTCs. Based on the DTCs, it appeared a network fault was causing the issue. There were several DTCs indicating the Front Controls Interface Module (FCIM) and Passenger Door Module (PDM – AKA: Door Control Module B) was not online. I now needed to find something in common with both modules. 

The wiring diagram shows the PDM and FCIM connected to Splice Block 36. According to the Service Information, Splice Block 36 is in the passenger kick panel. 

DTCs were cleared and the only DTCs that returned were for the Airbag system. I was able to reduplicate the customer’s concern by wiggling the wiring harness around the arrow. The communication DTCs returned as well. 

The Splice Block was cut out and the connections were hard wired which resulted in resolving the concern.

My initial plan was to test the MS-CAN circuits. Since this vehicle uses a Gateway Module, you can’t simply access the MS-CAN circuits at the DLC. You must access those circuits at the Gateway Module connector or at another module. Fortunately, I was able to diagnose this concern by isolating the fault based off DTCs.

Rotunda now makes a breakout box for the Gateway Module connector. I don’t have one of these yet, but plan on getting one soon. 

Here's entire IDS Session Log for reference.

Ford IDS performs quite a bit of job logging and allows you to go back and see important items such as time, tests performed, faults, and a whole lot more. I'm considering writing up some tutorials with best practices around IDS if there's enough interest. Please let me know if this is something that interests you.

The two wiring diagrams referenced were accessed through Ford's factory information system.

Thanks for reading.

+11

Albin from Leavenworth

 

Diagnostician
 

Nice right up !! This afternoon I had a problem on a GMC Acadia which went down about the same as your Ford problem.

0

Ray from North York

 

Diagnostician
 

Wow Robby, excellent diagnosis and presentation!

Ray

0

Charlie from Burbank

 

Technician
 

Great diagnosis!Thanks for sharing..

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Glen from Arthur

 

Owner/Technician
 

Excellent as always Robby. As for the IDS best practices I am sure if you write it will be worth the read. If anyone is interested in the Gateway module breakout box Rotunda has a video with more info youtube​.​com/watch?v=PH8sga…​.​be

+1

Robby from New Market

 

Mobile Technician
 

Really cool Glen. Thanks for sharing!

0

Scott from Claremont

 

Manager
 

Great write-up Robby, thanks for breaking down he logical steps taken to resolve the issue. I have a question about the splice block, why was there a connection issue? Was there corrosion? 

Second question is about IDS, how do you prevent the application from eleiminating your logs/recordings? I wanted to reference reference some log files recently and when I looked, I found that the stuff I knew I recorded ~6 months ago had disappeared.

0

Robby from New Market

 

Mobile Technician
 

There was corrosion in the Splice Block. This vehicle was a flood car that, according to customer, came out of North Carolina. However, Ford has used a couple of different Splice Blocks over the years, and they all have given problems. It's not just the Splice Blocks though. The Splice Blocks use very small terminals that develop bad connections. Many wiring harness connectors being used now have very small terminals that develop bad connections. 

IDS will only allow you to save a certain number of sessions before it forces you to delete some. Also, when IDS updates to the next software version, it will want to delete files over 60 days old. There are 2 ways to keep your sessions and recordings:

  1. One way is to archive every session. When you archive a session, IDS will take the session files from that vehicle and put them in a zip folder. You can import that session later to view the log and recordings. I have a dedicated folder where I save my archived sessions.
  2. IDS session files are saved in a hidden folder. To view that folder, you have to change Windows settings to allow you to view hidden folders. (I've attached a screenshot showing the windows directory where the IDS software looks for session files.) When I want to save all of my sessions, I'll create a new folder, then Copy & Paste all of the files from the "Sessions" folder into my new folder. If you do this often, I'd recommend adding a shortcut from the Sessions folder to the desktop.

process​.​filestackapi​.​com/resize=h:1000…

There are pros & cons to either way, but it would be difficult to get into all that right now. I will say this though - 

Knowing where the IDS software looks for sessions files is very useful in several ways. For example, you may run into a programming issue and you need to start a completely new session. However, during a programming failure, IDS will force you to use an existing session. If you remove the session files from the "Sessions" folder, you'll be able to start a completely new session.

+2

Scott from Claremont

 

Manager
 

Thanks Robby,

”Flood Vehicle” explains it and what’s sad is that this vehicle will likely continue to experience problems well into the future IMO.

On the IDS files, thanks for the insight. i know that we’ve chatted about this in the past, I think it would be great to see an article or two covering IDS which ultimately would be providing valuable insight.

0